Reference

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3/5/2015
Adjunctive aesthetic treatments for rosacea, melasma
Treating common skin conditions such as rosacea and melasma can build a bridge to aesthetic treatments, said experts at last years annual Cosmetic Bootcamp in Aspen, Colo.
Adjunctive aesthetic treatments for rosacea, melasma

Treating common skin conditions such as rosacea and melasma can build a bridge to aesthetic treatments, said experts at last years annual Cosmetic Bootcamp in Aspen, Colo.

Dr. LupoIn particular, said Mary P. Lupo, M.D., appropriately used procedures for these chronic skin conditions can be "a great way to increase your practice's cash-payment business. I'm all about physicians having more control over their lives and practices and being less dependent on government and insurance companies. Instead of being worried about the future, figure out how you can make your practice more profitable." She is a New Orleans-based dermatologist in private practice. Rosacea Treatment

For women in their 20s and 30s with rosacea, Dr. Lupo often recommends salicylic acid peels.According to Diane S. Berson, "Salicylic acid is lipophilic. Therefore, it penetrates the sebaceous gland and helps remove some of the oil. It's also related to aspirin, so it has anti-inflammatory properties." She is an associate professor, Department of Dermatology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and an assistant attending dermatologist, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York.

Dr. Lupo added, salicylic acid peels are "a fee-for-service, cash procedure you can add on that's reasonably priced. Patients will be happy with this," and open to antiaging and aesthetic treatments such as Botox Cosmetic (onabotulinum toxin A, Allergan) in the future.

However, Drs. Berson and Lupo advised against using glycolic acid peels on patients with rosacea who have sensitive skin. Because glycolic acid is a small, hydrophilic molecule, explained Dr. Berson, "It penetrates the dermis and can be irritating." To read the entire article, click on the link.

http://dermatologytimes.modernmedicine.com/dermato...

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