Reference

AMET works diligently to keep the following information updated with the most current medical aesthetic news.  This information has been supplied by numerous sources. AMET is not affiliated with any such sources, and the information provided does not reflect the views of AMET.  The function of this page is to simply provide information, and AMET does not accept responsibility or liability for any views/claims/rumors/errors that appears herein.  

10/7/2009
When Good Fillers Go Bad
Most cosmetic surgeons that were not "injection oriented" a decade ago now realize that fillers and neurotoxins have become an integral and necessary part of contemporary cosmetic surgery.
When Good Fillers Go Bad

Most cosmetic surgeons that were not "injection oriented" a decade ago now realize that fillers and neurotoxins have become an integral and necessary part of contemporary cosmetic surgery.

All fillers are capable of causing complications and most complications occur proximal to the syringe, meaning they are the fault of the surgeon or injector. When discussing filler-related complications, one must differentiate sequelae from true complications. Swelling and redness are sequelae; and hematoma, overfill, or granuloma are complications.

Some of the more commonly seen filler "complications" include the following:

* Swelling;
* Bruising;
* Asymmetric fill;
* Overcorrection;
* Tyndall Effect (superficial injection);
* Hematoma; and
* Herpetic flare.

Although pain control may seem out of place in an article about filler complications, I believe it is extremely relevant. One thing that has always amazed and bothered me is the cavalier attitude that many injectors take when it comes to pain control with filler injection. One of the best ways to get a grip on this concept is to get filler injections yourself, which usually makes most injectors think differently on the subject.

Injecting a numb patient is a better experience for both the surgeon and patient, and a more precise procedure can be performed when pain is removed from the experience.

I always shake my head when I hear an experienced injector say, "My patients are tough; they don't need pain control." These are the type of doctors I want doing business down the street, because sooner or later I will get their patients. I can't tell you how many filler patients that have come to my office, who have repeatedly had filler injection in other practices and then became my permanent patients because my procedure was painless.

They best way for a surgeon to understand this concept is to think about the dental model. Many people judge their dentist not by competence but by the comfort level of the visit.

More.

[Source: PSP]

http://www.plasticsurgerypractice.com/eReport/2009...

back to reference main