Reference

AMET works diligently to keep the following information updated with the most current medical aesthetic news.  This information has been supplied by numerous sources. AMET is not affiliated with any such sources, and the information provided does not reflect the views of AMET.  The function of this page is to simply provide information, and AMET does not accept responsibility or liability for any views/claims/rumors/errors that appears herein.  

4/24/2010
FDA Approves Polidocanol for Spider Veins
The FDA announced last week its approval of Asclera (polidocanol) injection for the treatment of spider veins (tiny varicose veins less than 1 mm in diameter) and reticular veins (those that are 1 mm to 3 mm in diameter). Asclera works by damaging the cell lining of blood vessels which closes the vessel.
FDA Approves Polidocanol for Spider Veins

FDA Approves Polidocanol for Spider Veins
The FDA announced last week its approval of Asclera (polidocanol) injection for the treatment of spider veins (tiny varicose veins less than 1 mm in diameter) and reticular veins (those that are 1 mm to 3 mm in diameter). Asclera works by damaging the cell lining of blood vessels which closes the vessel.

Common adverse reactions to Asclera include leakage and collection of blood from damaged blood vessels at the injection site (hematoma), bruising, irritation, discoloration, and pain at the injection site.

Sclerotherapy, laser and intense-pulsed-light therapy, radiofrequency (RF) or laser ablation, and ambulatory phlebectomy are the modern techniques used to ablate varicosities.

Use of Asclera joins hypertonic saline, hypertonic glucose, sodium morrhuate, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate as an option for sclerotherapy of spider veins.

Sclerotherapy is the most common treatment for both spider veins and reticular veins. The injected vein fades over the weeks following injection. The same vein may need to be treated more than once. Most patients can expect a 50% to 90% improvement. Sclerotherapy does not require anesthesia, and can be done in the doctor's office

http://www.plasticsurgerypractice.com/eReport/2010...

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